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The Rover SD1 and it’s competion.......         

The Competition

On each model of competition the Rover series has an answer in the form of economic  Rover 2000 Rover 2300S, 2600S and the sportier the most exclusive of its kind in the  Rover 3500 Vanden Plas. 

The Volvo

Launched in 1974 as model 75 the Volvo 240/260 series was an important step  forward in the field of safety, environment and driving pleasure for Volvo  Personvagnar. Also as an engine for the organisational changes within the company  was the series essential for the manufacturer from 1988.  Volvo PV marked the engines of the 200 Series with a B for the Swedish word Bensin,  which is petrol, or a D for the name Diesel. Furthermore, the manufacturer indicated  the volume of the engine with digits. Thus: 21 meant, for example, 2.1 litres. The  letters after the volume pointed out the fitting of a carburettor, a carburettor with  turbo, injection, injection with a catalytic converter, injection with a turbo or  injection with a turbo and a catalytic converter:  · B21A: petrol, 2,1 litre, carburettor   · B21AT: petrol, 2,1 litre, carburettor and retrofitted turbo   · B21E: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection   · B21F: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection and catalytic converter   · B21ET: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection and turbo   · B21FT: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection, turbo and catalytic converter 

Ford Granada

The European Ford Granada is a large executive car that was manufactured by Ford  Europe from 1972 untill 1994. The March 1972-released Granada succeeded the  British Ford Zephyr, and the German P7-series as Ford's European executive car  offering. At first, lower models in the range were called the Ford Consul. This may  have been because of a lawsuit by Granada Group a major British conglomerate of  the time; however, their application for an injunction failed at appeal and they could  not prevent Ford registering the name Granada as a trademark thus from 1975 on  they were all called Granadas. The car soon became popular for taxi, fleet, and  police use. It was also converted into limousine and hearse versions by the British  companies Coleman Milne and Woodall Nicholson. Traditional four-door limousines  were offered (both long and short versions) alongside an unusual four-door "coupé  limousine" (only 12 built), as well as hearses in either two- or four-door  configurations. Mechanically, the European Granada conformed to Ford convention, the initial range  using the Ford Essex V4 unit in 2.0 L displacement, and the "Essex" V6 engine in 2.5  and 3.0 L capacities. German models employed a Ford Taunus V4 engine in 1.7 L  displacement, or the 3.0L Essex V6, or, more commonly the "Cologne" V6 in 2.0, 2.3 or  2.6 L capacities. The V4 was later replaced by the Pinto unit. The car generally  followed mechanical layout of its predecessors Ford Zephyr/Zodiac, using a coil-  spring independent rear end, although front MacPherson struts were replaced by  double wishbones, introduced 18 months earlier in smaller TC Cortina and Taunus.  However, the Granada – like Ford 17M/20M/26M – featured drum brakes at rear, as  opposed to the Ford Zephyr/Zodiac rear disc brakes.

Renault 15 and Renault 17.

At the 1974 Paris Motor Show, the Renault 17TS was renamed the "17 Gordini". This  new name was an attempt to fill the gap left by the recently discontinued Renault 12  Gordini, nothing was changed beyond the badging. There was a minor facelift during March 1976, most noticeable on the grille of the 15,  where the chrome edge surround was replaced with a body-coloured one: the  headlights were enlarged and brought forward to a position approximately flush with  the surround. The grille of the 17 also lost its chrome surround, although on both cars  the partially chrome front bumper now curved up at the edges to roughly half-way up  the height of the grille. The R15 and R17 remained in production until summer 1979  when they were both replaced by the Renault Fuego. Britain's Autocar magazine tested a 1,289 cc Renault 15 TL in November 1972, shortly  after the model's UK debut.  The top speed of 94 mph (151 km/h) and the 0-60 mph  (97 km/h) time of 13.6 seconds put the car near the bottom of the list of competitor  vehicles selected for comparison, but overall fuel consumption for the test was class  leading at 31.8 mpg-imp (8.9 L/100 km; 26.5 mpg-US). The manufacturers'  recommended retail price of £1,370 was slightly lower than the UK sticker price on a  comparable Vauxhall Firenza Sport and Fiat 128 Coupe 1300: Ford's Capri 1300L at  £1,123 massively undercut comparable cars in the UK at the time. The test concluded  by pointing out that for buyers needing more power, more powerful Renault 15 and 17  variants were available, and that power apart, the 15 TL provided "a combination of  attractive styling and careful development, excellent comfort and a high level of  equipment and safety

Citroen CX

The Citroën CX is an executive car produced by the French automaker Citroën from  1974 to 1991. Citroën sold nearly 1.2 million CXs during its 16 years of production.  The CX was voted European Car of the Year in 1975. The name CX is the French  equivalent abbreviation of Cd for drag coefficient in English, drawing attention to the  car's aerodynamic styling, which was uncommon in 1974.  It is considered by some enthusiasts as the last "real Citroën" before Peugeot took  control of the company in 1976.  Available models were a four-door fastback, a station wagon (break, or estate car),  and a long-wheelbase model built on the break chassis. The CX employed Citroën's  unique hydropneumatic self-leveling suspension system.
Competition Fuel consumption compared Dimensions compared Competition
The Rover SD1 and it’s competion.......         

The Competition

On each model of competition the Rover series has an answer in the form  of economic Rover 2000 Rover 2300S, 2600S and the sportier the most  exclusive of its kind in the Rover 3500 Vanden Plas. 

The Volvo

Launched in 1974 as model 75 the Volvo 240/260 series was an important  step forward in the field of safety, environment and driving pleasure for  Volvo Personvagnar. Also as an engine for the organisational changes  within the company was the series essential for the manufacturer from  1988. Volvo PV marked the engines of the 200 Series with a B for the Swedish  word Bensin, which is petrol, or a D for the name Diesel. Furthermore, the  manufacturer indicated the volume of the engine with digits. Thus: 21  meant, for example, 2.1 litres. The letters after the volume pointed out  the fitting of a carburettor, a carburettor with turbo, injection, injection  with a catalytic converter, injection with a turbo or injection with a turbo  and a catalytic converter:  · B21A: petrol, 2,1 litre, carburettor · B21AT: petrol, 2,1 litre, carburettor and retrofitted turbo · B21E: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection · B21F: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection and catalytic converter   · B21ET: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection and turbo · B21FT: petrol, 2,1 litre, injection, turbo and catalytic  converter

Ford Granada

The European Ford Granada is a large executive car that was  manufactured by Ford Europe from 1972 untill 1994. The March 1972-  released Granada succeeded the British Ford Zephyr, and the German P7-  series as Ford's European executive car offering. At first, lower models in  the range were called the Ford Consul. This may have been because of a  lawsuit by Granada Group a major British conglomerate of the time;  however, their application for an injunction failed at appeal and they  could not prevent Ford registering the name Granada as a trademark thus  from 1975 on they were all called Granadas. The car soon became popular  for taxi, fleet, and police use. It was also converted into limousine and  hearse versions by the British companies Coleman Milne and Woodall  Nicholson. Traditional four-door limousines were offered (both long and  short versions) alongside an unusual four-door "coupé limousine" (only 12  built), as well as hearses in either two- or four-door configurations. Mechanically, the European Granada conformed to Ford convention, the  initial range using the Ford Essex V4 unit in 2.0 L displacement, and the  "Essex" V6 engine in 2.5 and 3.0 L capacities. German models employed a  Ford Taunus V4 engine in 1.7 L displacement, or the 3.0L Essex V6, or,  more commonly the "Cologne" V6 in 2.0, 2.3 or 2.6 L capacities. The V4  was later replaced by the Pinto unit. The car generally followed  mechanical layout of its predecessors Ford Zephyr/Zodiac, using a coil-  spring independent rear end, although front MacPherson struts were  replaced by double wishbones, introduced 18 months earlier in smaller TC  Cortina and Taunus. However, the Granada – like Ford 17M/20M/26M –  featured drum brakes at rear, as opposed to the Ford Zephyr/Zodiac rear  disc brakes.

Renault 15 and Renault 17.

At the 1974 Paris Motor Show, the Renault 17TS was renamed the "17  Gordini". This new name was an attempt to fill the gap left by the  recently discontinued Renault 12 Gordini, nothing was changed beyond the  badging. There was a minor facelift during March 1976, most noticeable on the  grille of the 15, where the chrome edge surround was replaced with a  body-coloured one: the headlights were enlarged and brought forward to  a position approximately flush with the surround. The grille of the 17 also  lost its chrome surround, although on both cars the partially chrome front  bumper now curved up at the edges to roughly half-way up the height of  the grille. The R15 and R17 remained in production until summer 1979  when they were both replaced by the Renault Fuego.  Britain's Autocar magazine tested a 1,289 cc Renault 15 TL in November  1972, shortly after the model's UK debut.  The top speed of 94 mph (151  km/h) and the 0-60 mph (97 km/h) time of 13.6 seconds put the car near  the bottom of the list of competitor vehicles selected for comparison, but  overall fuel consumption for the test was class leading at 31.8 mpg-imp  (8.9 L/100 km; 26.5 mpg-US). The manufacturers' recommended retail  price of £1,370 was slightly lower than the UK sticker price on a  comparable Vauxhall Firenza Sport and Fiat 128 Coupe 1300: Ford's Capri  1300L at £1,123 massively undercut comparable cars in the UK at the  time. The test concluded by pointing out that for buyers needing more  power, more powerful Renault 15 and 17 variants were available, and that  power apart, the 15 TL provided "a combination of attractive styling and  careful development, excellent comfort and a high level of equipment and  safety

Citroen CX

The Citroën CX is an executive car produced by the French automaker  Citroën from 1974 to 1991. Citroën sold nearly 1.2 million CXs during its  16 years of production. The CX was voted European Car of the Year in  1975. The name CX is the French equivalent abbreviation of Cd for drag  coefficient in English, drawing attention to the car's aerodynamic styling,  which was uncommon in 1974.  It is considered by some enthusiasts as the last "real Citroën" before  Peugeot took control of the company in 1976. Available models were a four-door fastback, a station wagon (break, or  estate car), and a long-wheelbase model built on the break chassis. The  CX employed Citroën's unique hydropneumatic self-leveling suspension  system.
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